10k Running Plans

If you’re looking to improve your 10k running pb, then the first step is to follow a structured running plan. Not only will this give your running training more purpose, but it will help to ensure you have the correct balance between training stress and recovery, so you achieve more consistent progression.

In this section you’ll find links to some 10k training plans that I’ve put together, using the same formula that I use with my own training.


Running a faster 10k

As with anything, if you train consistently and purposefully, using key training methods you will improve your 10k running performance. The problem is, most runners don’t always run with a purpose – other than hitting their weekly mileage target.

So what does it take to run a fast 10k time?

Firstly you need to run consistently, making sure to run enough mileage – and at the right intensity – to build aerobic fitness, conditioning and improve your running efficiency.

But, that’s not enough on it’s own, you also need to include some specific training to improve your ability to sustain a fast running pace throughout a 10k. A good approach is to include some tempo and threshold training. This involves running at a sustained faster pace for longer intervals, normally lasting anywhere from 10 to 20minutes – sometimes longer.

While paying attention to running mileage and improving our ability to sustain a good running pace is a very good starting point, we can take this one stage further by adding in some high intensity interval training (HIIT).

Not only does HIIT training have many health benefits, but it’s a great way to ramp up your running performance. Essentially, this involves running short intervals, at speeds that are slightly faster than your current 10k, and often closer to 5k running pace.

It’s also beneficial to include some even faster intervals along with specific hill running training to provide additional strength training benefits.

The important point is: running a fast 10k is not just about mileage, you also need to include some faster interval based training.

While, running fast intervals are beneficial, to get the most from these they need to be specific, purposeful and targeted towards our own individual goals.

Below I’ve included links to some 10k running training plans that, I’ve put together to help you to improve your 10k running performance.


8-12 Week 10k Running Plans

If you like the 10k running plans, and find them useful, please support this site by sharing any content you find useful. This helps to motivate me to continue to add more free content on this site.

It’s also good to hear stories of when these plans have proved useful – so feel free to give me feedback on how you’ve found the plans.


Moderate 10k Running Plan

Aimed at runners who’ve consistently run 20-25miles/week and have some experience of intervals, hill running training, threshold training. Ideally, with experience of completing 1-2 quality workouts per week.

>> View the Moderate 10k plan


Intermediate 10k Running Plan

The Intermediate 10k plan is for runners with a history of consistently running 25-35miles/week. Ideally, with experience of running 1-2 quality training sessions per week, such as hills, intervals, and threshold/tempo training runs.

>> View the intermediate 10k Plan


Advanced 10k Running Plan

The Advanced 10k running plan is aimed at runners with a strong base level of running fitness. Who’ve consistently run 45+miles/week, including 2-3 quality training sessions per week such as intervals, hills and threshold runs.

>> View the advanced 10k Plan


Elite 10k Running Plan

The Elite 10k running plan is aimed at runners that have consistently run 50-60miles/week of training. Ideally, you should be used to running 2-3 quality training sessions per week, including intervals, hills, and threshold training.

>> View the elite 10k plan


Related pages:

References

Acevado, E.O. and Goldfarb, A.H. (1989). Increased training intensity effects on plasma lactate, ventilatory thresholds, and endurance. Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise. 21, 563-568.

Costill, D.L. (1986). Inside Running: Basics of Sports Physiology. Benchmark Press: Indinapolis, USA.

Coyle, E.F., Feltner, M.E., Kautz, S., Hamilton, M.T., Montain, S.J., Baylor, A.M., Abraham, L.D. and Petrek, G.W. (1991). Physiological and biochemical factors associated with elite endurance cycling performance. Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise. 23, 93-107.

Fallowfield, J.L. and Wilkinson, J.L. (1999). Improving sports performance in Middle and Long-Distance Running. Chichester: John Wiley and Sons, LTD.

Jones, A.M. (1998). A five year physiological case study of an Olympic runner. British Journal of Sports Medicine. 32, 39-43.

Londeree, B.R. (1997). Effect of training on lactate/ventilatory thresholds: a meta analysis. Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise. 29, 837-843.

Martin, D.E. and Coe, P.N. (1997). Better Training for Distance Runners (2nd edition). Human Kinetics: Champaign, IL, USA.

Neumann, G., Pfutzner, A. and Berbalk, A. (2000). Successful Endurance Training. Oxford: Meyer and Meyer Sport (UK), LTD.

Noakes, T.D. (1991). Lore of Running. Human Kinetics: Champaign, IL, USA.

Pate, R.R. and Branch, J.D. (1992). Training for endurance sport. Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise. 24, S340-343.

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